Interesting Articles

Does Psychotherapy work?

Does Psychotherapy work?

The short answer is: yes. We know from scientific research that psychotherapy works. Years of careful scientific investigations have clearly demonstrated its effectiveness. Both qualitative and quantitative reviews of thousands of scientific studies have shown that about 75 to 80% of patients who enter psychotherapy benefit from it. This finding generalizes across a wide range of disorders and different therapy formats, including individual, couple, family, and group therapies. Read more about Does Psychotherapy work?

The Ethics of Psychotherapy

The Ethics of Psychotherapy

The practice of psychotherapy is governed by many rules. Since it is considered a medical procedure, there is a tightly controlled legal framework for it. For psychotherapy to be effective, the therapist must follow particular rules of engagement for the communication process, for instance not to talk about herself too much during the therapy sessions (this is called self-disclosure.) These are the clinical rules for the psychotherapy process. Finally, psychotherapy also has a business dimension, and there are rules that govern the business relation as well.

Ethical rules for psychotherapy build upon the body of principles established over the centuries by the healthcare professions.  It begins with the ancient Greek Hippocratic Oath that defines the relationship between a doctor and her patient. Here is the updated and modernized version from the World Medical Association, last amended in 1994: Read more about The Ethics of Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy via the Internet?

Psychotherapy via the Internet?

A study found that online psychotherapy is just as efficient as conventional therapy. Researchers at the University of Zurich have conducted a study in order to compare online psychotherapy with conventional face-to-face therapy. Six therapists treated 62 patients, the majority of whom were suffering from moderate depression. The patients were divided into two equal groups and randomly assigned to one of the therapeutic forms. The treatment consisted of eight sessions with different established techniques that stem from cognitive behavior therapy and could be carried out both orally and in writing. Patients treated online had to perform one predetermined written task per therapy unit — such as querying their own negative self-image.

Three months after the end of the therapy, patients with online treatment displayed fewer symptoms than patients treated face-to-fac Read more about Psychotherapy via the Internet?

The new DSM-5

The new DSM-5

The DSM manual for mental disorders is first and foremost a guidebook for clinicians.  It may be helpful for clients to understand their issues, but the DSM is not meant to be a resource for clients. Here is an overview of what is new in the next generation of the DSM, now in it’s fifth iteration. 1 It has these major sections:

  1. Introduction and clear information on how to use the DSM.
  2. Provides information and categorical diagnoses.
  3. Section III provides self-assessment tools, as well as areas that require more research. Read more about The new DSM-5

Notes:

  1. For this overview, I am using information found at www.psychiatry.org and www.psychcentral.com.
What makes a good therapist?

What makes a good therapist?

 We know that psychotherapy works across all modalities for about 75 to 80% of all clients. The therapeutic relationship itself is key to the success of the process. Therefore, the next question is: What makes a good therapist? A review of the existing research was summarized by Bruce Wampold into the following traits of a good psychotherapist: 1

Notes:

  1. Wampold, B. E. (2013). The Great Psychotherapy Debate: Models, Methods, and Findings (Counseling and Psychotherapy: Investigating Practice from Scientific, Historical, and Cultural Perspectives) (1 edition.). Routledge.
Getting the most out of Therapy

Getting the most out of Therapy

Psychotherapy may not cure your condition or make an unpleasant situation go away. But it can give you the power to cope in a healthy way and to feel better about yourself and your life.

Here are a few tips to get the most out of the process:

  • You should feel comfortable with your therapist. If you don’t, look for another therapist with whom you feel more at ease.
  • Approach therapy as a partnership. Therapy is most effective when you’re an active participant and share in decision making. Make sure you and your therapist agree about the major issues and how to tackle them. Together, you can set goals and measure progress over time. Read more about Getting the most out of Therapy