Interesting Articles

Anxiety in women and people under the age of 35

Anxiety in women and people under the age of 35

Here are some excerpts from an article on the prevalence of anxiety in women and young people, from June 6, 2016 in MedicalExpress.com:

“Women are almost twice as likely to experience anxiety as men, according to a review of existing scientific literature, led by the University of Cambridge. The study also found that people from Western Europe and North America are more likely to suffer from anxiety than people from other cultures.
The review, published today in the journal Brain and Behavior, also highlighted how anxiety disorders often provide a double burden on people experiencing other health-related problems, such as heart disease, cancer and even pregnancy.

Anxiety disorders, which often manifest as excessive worry, fear and a tendency to avoid potentially stressful situations including social gatherings, are some of the most common mental health problems in the Western world. The annual cost related to the disorders in the United States is estimated to be $42.3 million. In the European Union, over 60 million people are affected by anxiety disorders in a given year. Read more about Anxiety in women and people under the age of 35

Does Psychotherapy work?

Does Psychotherapy work?

The short answer is: yes. We know from scientific research that psychotherapy works. Years of careful scientific investigations have clearly demonstrated its effectiveness. Both qualitative and quantitative reviews of thousands of scientific studies have shown that about 75 to 80% of patients who enter psychotherapy benefit from it. This finding generalizes across a wide range of disorders and different therapy formats, including individual, couple, family, and group therapies. Read more about Does Psychotherapy work?

Psychotherapy via the Internet?

Psychotherapy via the Internet?

A study found that online psychotherapy is just as efficient as conventional therapy. Researchers at the University of Zurich have conducted a study in order to compare online psychotherapy with conventional face-to-face therapy. Six therapists treated 62 patients, the majority of whom were suffering from moderate depression. The patients were divided into two equal groups and randomly assigned to one of the therapeutic forms. The treatment consisted of eight sessions with different established techniques that stem from cognitive behavior therapy and could be carried out both orally and in writing. Patients treated online had to perform one predetermined written task per therapy unit — such as querying their own negative self-image.

Three months after the end of the therapy, patients with online treatment displayed fewer symptoms than patients treated face-to-fac Read more about Psychotherapy via the Internet?